Bridges of Madrid

By | 20 February, 2014 | 0 comments

1) Puente Segovia

The oldest bridge that crosses the Manzanares river, dating back to the period of King Felipe II. The king ordered one of favourite engineers to carry out the job, Don Juan de Herrera, who he also entrusted with other constructions such as the monastery of El Escorial and the palace of Aranjuez, among many others.

It is made of granite and characterizes itself for the semi-circular arch that decreases in size the further it goes away from the centre, with the two ends being the smallest.

Puente Segocia, de The City Project

2) Puente de Toledo

Its semi-circular arches and row of balconies are its most characteristic trait, producing a magical effect in the evenings and when the night falls as they reflect in the river’s waters. Of churrigueresque Baroque style, it was built between 1718 and 1732 by the architect Pedro de Ribera.

Puente Toledo, de druidabruxux

3) Puente de los Franceses

Its original name was not this one but the locals ended up giving it its current one due to the nationality of its builders. It was built by the French in approximately 1860 in bricks and granite, with the aim of giving the railway an access to the city.

Puente de los Franceses, de Stable Mechanism

4) Puente de la Reina Victoria

Built in the early 20th century, this reinforced-concrete bridge with Modernist touches owes its name to Victoria Eugenie of Battenberg. Queen Victoria, granddaughter of the famous British queen of the same name, reigned between 1906 and 1931 as the consort of King Alfonso XIII.

Puente de la Reina Victoria, de M. Martín Vicente

5) Twin bridges: Matadero and Invernadero

These are two identical bridges that cross Madrid Río and lead to the old Madrid slaughterhouse, today a cultural space where we can visit art exhibitions and see shows. They are built out of concrete and their vaults have been decorated with mosaics by Daniel Canogar.

Puentes gemelos, de druidabruxux

2) Puente de Toledo

Puente Toledo, de druidabruxux

Son característicos sus arcos de medio punto y sus balconadas, que producen un efecto mágico al atardecer y al anochecer al verse reflejados en el agua del río. De estilo barroco churrigueresco,  fue construido entre los años 1718 y 1732 por el arquitecto Pedro de Ribera.

3) Puente de los Franceses

Puente de los Franceses, de Stable Mechanism

Su nombre original no era éste, pero los madrileños terminaron llamándolo de esta forma en alusión a la nacionalidad de sus ingenieros. Fue construido hacia 1860 en ladrillo y granito, con el fin de dar un acceso al ferrocarril hacia la ciudad.

4) Puente de la Reina Victoria

Puente de la Reina Victoria, de M. Martín Vicente

Construido a principios del siglo XX, este puente de hormigón armado con aires modernistas debe su nombre a Victoria Eugenia de Battenberg. La reina Victoria, nieta de la célebre monarca británica, reinó entre 1906 y 1931 como consorte del rey Alfonso XIII.

5) Puentes gemelos: Matadero e Invernadero

Puentes gemelos, de druidabruxux

Se trata de dos pasarelas idénticas que atraviesan Madrid Río y dan paso al antiguo Matadero de Madrid, hoy espacio cultural donde podemos visitar exposiciones de arte y espectáculos. Están construidas en hormigón y sus bóvedas han sido decoradas con mosaicos de Daniel Canogar.

Escrito por Laura Blanco

Categories: Guías Madrid, Madrid Turismo

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

Mostrar